Description

Introduction (without this heading)
Write an introduction paragraph for your review. This paragraph
states the topic and inquiry questions for this review
states that it is inductive/deductive and why
c. tells the reader specific information on how many articles you reviewed and how you sorted the articles into common themes based on findings (results).

2. Body (without this heading)
Before you begin this section, be sure that you have sorted your articles into different themes based on the articles’ findings (sometimes called results). After you sort your articles, it is important to give your sorted groups a descriptive name. The names of the sorted articles will become your headings for each of the paragraphs that you write in the body of your review. The body of your literature review will include,

a. Theme 1: a paragraph or several paragraphs that describe the first theme that you identified and compare, contrast and/or connect the articles you’ve selected.
b. Theme 2: a paragraph or several paragraphs that describes the second theme that you identified and compare, contrast and/or connect the articles you’ve selected.
d. Theme 3: a paragraph or several paragraphs that describes the third theme that you identified and compare, contrast and/or connect the articles you’ve selected.
… …

3 Summary
This is the last paragraph of your literature review. In this paragraph, it is important to briefly summarize the main findings from the articles that you reviewed and to point out how your inquiry questions were answered or not answered, what the gap is (what if my questions are all answered – you then need to identify new inquiries so that you will contribute to the field)..

I already have 5 sources but I need 3 more to make the requirement of 8 sources.
D’Ausilio, A., Novembre, G., Fadiga, L., & Keller, P. (2015). What can music tell us about social interaction? Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 19(3), 111–114. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2015.01.005

Greenman, D. (2009). The joy and therapeutic benefits of live music. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 15(3), 181–181.

Schäfer, T. (2016). The Goals and Effects of Music Listening and Their Relationship to the Strength of Music Preference. PloS One, 11(3), e0151634–e0151634. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0151634

Shibazaki, K., & Marshall, N. (2017). Exploring the impact of music concerts in promoting well-being in dementia care. Aging & Mental Health, 21(5), 468–476. https://doi.org/10.1080/13607863.2015.1114589

Swarbrick, D., Bosnyak, D., Livingstone, S., Bansal, J., Marsh-Rollo, S., Woolhouse, M., & Trainor, L. (2019). How Live Music Moves Us: Head Movement Differences in Audiences to Live Versus Recorded Music. Frontiers in Psychology, 9, 2682–2682. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.02682

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