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I am Danielle Peter

( At least two responses must be at least 100 words. Do not make assumptions. Instead, assume the historical role of someone who lived in the United States during this period. Whatever you write should be in character. Be creative! Remember that everything you argue, although in character, must be grounded in academic research and must demonstrate you have done the required work.)

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My name is Bobby Seale, we first must give power to the people and through the people, we will achieve the so-called American Dream. Post-World War II, African Americans began to experience newfound rights. These post-war years offered more opportunities than many capitalized on like moving to the North into the suburbs, or at least they tried to. Restrictive covenants generally kept African Americans out of the all-white neighborhoods (HIST222 | Lesson 6, 2012). This type of discrimination continued for several years and change from a civil rights perspective was soon to happen. The search for methods for fighting for racial injustice in America for African Americans had begun. In the 1950’s people like Martin Luther King, Jr. accelerated the struggle for civil rights that went on into the 60s.
By the end of the winter of 1960, black southern students were taking King-and their own consciences-seriously participating in sit-ins into every Southern state except Mississippi due to them being too violent. Much of this was gaining the attention of the nation and the world (HIST222 | Lesson 6, 2012). John F. Kennedy became an asset to King and fellow members. JFK wanted to Southern freedom movement organizations to not make the country look bad by how it treats its citizens. This, in turn, won King’s endorsement from a political standpoint. The Student Nonviolent Coordination Committee (SNCC) would work with the local NAACP and others in lieu of the interracial group or Freedom Riders. This became the Albany Movement of 1961 which King says was a failure but they took note of the students standing up to the segregated systems. The SNCC became extremely influential in bringing light to racial discrimination and captured others who were willing to join the fight for racial equality and justice.
The word was spreading out to people like Fannie Lou Hamer. A woman that was not aware of rights like voting that was allowed, the SNCC was responsible for informing her. Though progress was happening, members like Stokely Carmichael and John Lewis began questioning the movement’s integrationist agenda ((HIST222 | Lesson 6, 2012). This gave birth to the Black Power movement, one that I am proud to be a member of. This is a voice not only for African Americans but anyone that wants to empower themselves into gaining civil rights.

____________RESPONSE FOR THIS #2  _______________

Good Evening Brothers and Sisters, my name is Tia Jackson and I am the current Secretary of the SNCC here at Northwestern University. I want to thank all of you coming out and joining us as we stand here on May 4th 1968, just one month after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. has been assassinated. (Black Revolution on Campus, 2012.). Now we come together tonight to raise awareness of the changes needed for Black students here in our very own University as well as Universities across America. We are unfortunately still not being awarded the same rights as white students and Civil Rights have still not been awarded to us. I am here to call upon all of you to help with this movement. So many of you are in fear due to the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and I understand that, but we must not give up the fight. Dr. King was a firm push for us to be here today, but we as the SNCC feel there has to be a different way of fighting for our rights. I am thankful for Dr. King’s commitment but do believe that we will need to take action by all means necessary, we must fight and not stand down to our oppressors. We believe that from here on out we need to adapt to the ideals of Malcom X and not let anyone take our freedoms from us.
I had the opportunity to watch his interview on October 11th of last year and he spoke of something that resonated in mind for me. He said and I quote “When we see our people being brutalized by white bigots, white racists, we think that they are foolish to allow themselves to be beaten and brutalized and do nothing whatsoever to protect themselves.” (Reel America: 1963 Interview with Malcolm X, n.d.). You see that statement changed much of my thought process of how we need to go forward with our fight for Civil rights. We must fight back no matter the consequences, fighting in peace brought death to our dear Brother Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tonight we must stand tall as we speak our demands for change here at Northwestern University. We will no longer take being beaten down for just wanting the same rights as White Americans. We all deserve to be treated equal and have the right to fair education. Changes to the system begins with us and we must take this night to push for equality for Blacks in the University system. I ask for your stance and backing, join us as we go forth for change, for if we do not take it, it will never be had.

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